Yesterday, WWE Hall of Famer Paul Orndorff died at the age of 71. Orndorff was better known as “Mr. Wonderful.” He was such a great sports entertainer.

The reason for this article is because so many former professional wrestlers have died because of so many different awful reasons. I could name you multiple former pro wrestlers that had their futures ahead of them or were retired legends who have had sad deaths. I’m pretty sure there is a book out written by someone about all the wrestlers' deaths called The Sickness.

These men and women that were pro wrestlers have died because of overdosing, heart attacks, alcoholism, suicide, addiction, and years of doing steroids. Most of them have lived in poverty or close to it.

Hopefully the WWE and other organizations have really thought this out and have programs to help current and former wrestlers with their personal problems and health issues. I really believe they do have options for these people, but they have to want to get help!

Like I said, I could name you multiple former household names in professional wrestling that have gone to their deaths because they have given up.

Diamond Dallas Page reached out to two former Hall of Famers Jake the Snake Roberts and Scott Hall and he saved their lives through DDP Yoga, which is his life and livelihood now. Page is a Hall of Famer himself who thrives on paying it forward to hundreds of people.

So, another legend “Mr. Wonderful” Paul Orndorff died on Monday at the age of 71 way too early. He had struggled with health issues for many years. RIP “Mr. Wonderful.”

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