When going out of town in Michigan, the majority of people travel north. When they do, it's always a goal to hit the road as early as possible to avoid all the traffic on 1-75. Most of that traffic is due to all the road construction across the state. Well, you'll be happy to know that won't be an issue (for the most part) this holiday weekend.

The Michigan Department of Transportation is planning to pause road work and will be lifting traffic restrictions across the state. This should help a ton with all the holiday travel that's expected this Memorial Day weekend.

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According to WDIV, MDOT says it’ll be lifting lane restrictions on more than 62% of road and bridge projects. It's estimated that more than 1.1 million Michigan residents will travel 50 miles or more from home during the Memorial Day weekend. That's a huge increase (57%) compared to last year.

Local work zones that will remain active during Memorial Day weekend

  • - I-69, Genesee County, will have two lanes open in each direction between Hammerberg Road and M-54 with a traffic shift.
  • - I-69, Lapeer County, will have one lane open in each direction between Newark Road and Harvey Road. Ramp closures at M-53 will remain in place.
  • - I-69, St. Clair County, will have one lane open in each direction between Miller Road and Stapleton Road with traffic shifts. The eastbound I-69 ramps at Riley Center Road will remain closed.
  • - I-75/M-46, Saginaw County, has three open lanes in the peak direction of travel with a moveable barrier wall between I-675 and Hess Road.
  • - M-52, Saginaw County, has one lane open in alternating directions over Marsh Creek via temporary signals.
  • - M-65, Arenac County, is closed between US-23 and Main Street in Twining.

This clearly is not the entire list of projects. For all MDOT projects happening across the state, go to Michigan.gov/Drive.

Drive safe this holiday weekend and use your damn blinker!

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On the list, there's a robust mix of offerings from great schools and nightlife to high walkability and public parks. Some areas have enjoyed rapid growth thanks to new businesses moving to the area, while others offer glimpses into area history with well-preserved architecture and museums. Keep reading to see if your hometown made the list.