Michigan health officials say people should avoid eating fish from the Huron River and several connected waterbodies, and avoid foam on Michigan lakes and rivers. Apparently, they're known to have per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the water.

According to WDIV, the “Do Not Eat” fish advisory was issued in 2018 for fish from the Huron River where North Wixom Road crosses into Oakland County to the mouth of the Huron River as it enters Lake Erie in Wayne County.

Also in 2018, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services issued an advisory for residents to avoid swallowing foam (I don't know why you'd ever do this) on the Huron River as it may have high levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).  It's also advised to keep your pets away from the foam as well.

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The advisory includes:

  • Norton Creek (Oakland County)
  • Hubbell Pond, also known as Mill Pond (Oakland County)
  • Kent Lake (Oakland County)
  • Ore Lake (Livingston County)
  • Strawberry & Zukey Lake (Livingston County)
  • Gallagher Lake (Livingston County)
  • Loon Lake (Livingston County)
  • Whitewood Lakes (Livingston County)
  • Base Line and Portage Lakes (Livingston/Washtenaw County line)
  • Barton Pond (Washtenaw County)
  • Geddes Pond (Washtenaw County)
  • Argo Pond (Washtenaw County)
  • Ford Lake (Washtenaw County)
  • Belleville Lake (Wayne County)
  • Flat Rock Impoundment (Wayne County)

I've noticed foam along the shorelines before but never thought anything about it and definitely never thought they could be dangerous. From what I understand, all foams aren't dangerous. WDIV reports that there is naturally occurring foam that piles up in bays, eddies or river barriers such as dams. This foam is off-white and/or brown in color and may have an earthy or fishy smell. Naturally occurring foam can have high amounts of bacteria and it is best to rinse off after contact with it as well.