We’ve officially entered spooky season, which means Halloween-lovers are carving pumpkins, stocking up on candy, and getting their costumes ready for the big day.

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Pro Mover Reviews created a list of 150 spooky destinations in the United States that might not be well-known but are worth checking out. They have created the top 3 spookiest places for a scare in Michigan.

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Terrace Inn and 1911 Restaurant:

Located in Bay View, Petoskey, you can book a stay for only $99 per night and keep an eye out for the ghostly man on the balcony, the woman in white floating through the halls, or the ghost child playing in the basement. The Terrace Inn and 1911 Restaurant opened in June of 1911. William J. DeVol purchased the Inn for his wife.

According to rumor, The Terrace Inn is haunted by the spirits of 2 workers who died when a beam fell on them during construction. If you'd like goosebumps, they recommend you stay in room 211.

Michigan's First State Prison:

The tunnels deep below Michigan’s First Prison hold many mysteries and the spooky feeling you get while standing in it makes you realize that they weren’t used solely for transporting prisoners.

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While most of the prison was destroyed, the underground structures remain for free tours. Constructed in Jackson in 1842, paranormal hunters speak of screams in the tunnels reminiscent of riots that took place in 1952.

Mackinac Island:

European expeditions in Michigan led to many clashes with the Native Americans. Travel to Mackinac Island and check out the war grounds still stained from the blood of fallen people during the War of 1812. These sights have an eerie atmosphere of death that surrounds them.

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A walking tour called "Haunts of Mackinac" begins at 9 p.m. each night at the Bicycle Street Inn and lasts about 90 minutes. A guide tells memorable stories while leading the nostalgic history tour to several haunted sites on Mackinac Island.

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