President Joe Biden is making a trip to General Motors in Detroit today to support his new bipartisan infrastructure deal that's aimed at making electric vehicles (EV's) the focus for the future of the car industry.

The plan is to curb planet-warming carbon emissions while creating high-paying jobs at the same time. In order to do this, we have to dump a ton of cash into the foundation of EV's and the president will be here today to convince us that Ev's are indeed the future. 

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Biden on Wednesday will visit a General Motors plant in Detroit that manufactures electric vehicles. He'll use the occasion to make the case that the $7.5 billion in the new infrastructure law for electric vehicle chargers will help America get "off the sidelines" on green-energy manufacturing. Currently, the U.S. market share of plug-in electric vehicle sales is one-third the size of the Chinese EV market.

 

The plant won't see much direct impact from the infrastructure spending, but it will benefit from $7.5 billion designated to help build an electric vehicle charging network.

 

Biden wanted $15 billion to build 500,000 chargers and hasn't given a number for how many could be constructed for half that amount. Source:NBC25.com

Of course, this doesn't come without its controversy. Some Republicans are criticizing the president for focusing on electric vehicles when Americans are paying an arm & leg for gasoline and natural gas prices.  I for one feel like the move to Ev's is a great idea, but it's gonna cost us a lot of time and money. Not to mention EV's haven't been around long enough for low-income families to hop on board. Take for instance Ford's new flagship EV the F-150 Lightning which has a base price of $40k! Where I'm from, that's a house!

I'm excited about the future and what's to come. Now the question is how will our president pull off such a huge push into EV's? We'll find out tonight when president Biden hits the mic and gives us the details.

Stay posted...

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