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Three Michigan Catholic high schools are suing the state due to the recent ban of in-person learning. They feel the ban violates their right to practice their faith.

To limit the spread of COVID-19, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Director Dr. Robert Gordon extended the ban on in-person learning at high schools, colleges and universities. This obviously didn't sit well with three catholic schools.

According to The Detroit Free Press, Everest Collegiate High School and Academy in Clarkston, Fr. Gabriel Richard High School in Ann Arbor and Lansing Catholic High School — along with the Michigan Association of Non-Public Schools say they should be allowed to offer in-person learning like elementary, middle and boarding schools do.

Brian Broderick, executive director of the association, which represents hundreds of private schools across the state:

The state’s latest order inhibits the faith formation of students and violates their constitutional right to practice religion while leaving open secular businesses where transmission of COVID-19 is more likely to occur. While faith is integrated into curriculum, physical presence at a faith-based school allows for additional, unique integration beyond classroom instruction. This includes religious services, participation in the sacraments and the overall Christian community.

While I totally understand their complaint and frustrations. What I don't understand is how the ban violates their right to practice their faith. I mean, you can practice faith virtually, right? I don't think the argument that "physical presence allows for additional, unique intergration beyond classroom instruction" can be justified in my opinion. I could say the same thing about my kid and that he does better in school when he's physically there. Somehow when you include religion all of a sudden it's becomes more important, if that makes sense.

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