As much as I don't like it, Michigan has its fair share of snakes and other reptiles. I don't have a problem with turtles and lizards but I do have a problem with snakes. Ever since I was a kid, I've had a fear of snakes.

Michigan's Department of Natural Resources is hoping that the public will help them track frogs, toads, salamanders, snakes, lizards, or turtles while out exploring or hiking.

According to MLive, this includes rare species like the Blanding’s turtle, eastern box turtle, spotted turtle and wood turtle and the threatened eastern massasauga rattlesnake.

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If you do see any of the above mentioned, you can submit your findings at Michigan.gov/EyesInTheField.

Amy Bleisch, DNR wildlife technician:

Reptiles and amphibians benefit from conservation work done by the DNR and partners, but we also need assistance from community scientists to track how their populations are doing.

Your observations help provide that data. It is especially important we get sighting reports of these rare species to help shape our conservation efforts here in Michigan.

The information is important to the Department of Natural Resources because it helps with information on trends, distribution and relative abundance for Michigan’s reptile and amphibian species and informs the conservation efforts outlined in Michigan’s Wildlife Action Plan.

Reptile and amphibian sightings also are appreciated and can be shared at MIHerpAtlas.org.

I'm down to help the DNR with whatever information that I can provide while I'm out hiking or whatever but if I come across one of these Eastern Massasauga rattlesnakes, I'm out of there. That snake is Michigan's only venomous snake, and one of only two rattlesnake species in the Great Lakes region. Even though it's venomous, they say the snake is pretty timid. Honestly, that doesn't make me feel any better.

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